Mazor Architectural Sites of Rajasthan for RAS/RTS Mains updated syllabus

 

Adhai-Din-ka-Jhonpra Ajmer a Masjid built by Qutub-ud-Din-Aibak, first Sultan of Delhi, in AD 1199 contemporary to the other one built at Qutub-Minar complex of Delhi known as Quwal-ul-Islam mosque (power of Islam). Sultan Iltutmish had subsequently beautified it in AD 1213 with a screen pierced by corbelled engrailed arches which appears in this country for the first time.
Baori on the Ajmer-Jaipur Road Ajmer The baori is simple in construction with an almost square tank (5.60 m x 5.00 m) at the northern end, which is approached by a 3.20 m wide stepped passage from the south. The western face of the tank has two pillars with intricate carvings of vase-and-foliage motifs, which may represent remains of some ancient temple in the nearby area. Other sculptures which are fixed in the passage walls include Ganesa, Vishnu and other deities.  The baori is datable to 17th century AD.
Badshahi Haveli Ajmer Built under the order of the Akbar, this Haveli has a pillared hall surrounded by a double colourande with wide bracket capitals and a room on a all four corners.  It is rectangular in shape and has its entrance through eastern verandah. The pillars, brackets and chhajjas of this building are almost similar to those of the audience hall in the magazine. It was refurbished and converted by one of Akbar’s Amirs for his residence.
Saheli Bazar Buildings in Daulat Bagh Ajmer It is a three-sided cellar complex which has access from the Daulatbagh side. The cells are small in size and have a narrow verandah in front. The construction material used was stone rubble and lakhauri brick in lime mortar with lime plaster.
Mahal Badshahi Pushkar This is a small structure with two identical pavilions of red sandstone standing on a raised plinth built by the Mughal emperor Jahangir in A.D. 1615. A Persian inscription in Nastaliq characters over the door of the northern pavilion indicates the date of the structure.
Bhandasar Jain Temple Bikaner The Bhandasar Jaina temple dedicated to Sumatinath, consists of a garbhagriha, an antarala, a mahamandapa and an ardhamandapa. The sanctum is pancharatha on plan which is crowned by a lofty sikhara having karina-amalakas and an amalaka at the top.  The interior walls and pillars of the sanctum and mandapa is extensively painted, are late of origin.  Stylistically, the temple is assignable to circa twelfth century A.D.
Jain Temple of Susani Goddess Morkhana The temple is dedicated to goddess Susani, the Kuladevi of the Suranas, a gotra of the mahajanas. The temple is built on a high platform and consists of a sanctum cella, enshrining an image of the goddess, open hall and frontal porch. It is built of Jaisalmer stone. An inscription of A.D. 1172 attests to the antiquity of the enshrined deity, though the existing temple is later.
Mahakal  temples Bijolia The ancient site of Bijolian (Vindhyavali) assumed importance as a holy place for the Jainas and Saivas. Of the two rock inscriptions, the one dated V.S. 1226 belonging to the Chahamanas records the genealogy of the Chahamanas upto the coronation of Somesvara and mentions names of several Brahmanical temples, then existing in Vindhyavali and neighbouring places. One of these temples was that of Mahakala.
Rock Inscriptions (12th century) Bijolia The ancient site of Bijolian (Vindhyavali) assumed importance as a holy place for the Jainas and Saivas. Of the two rock inscriptions, the one dated V.S. 1226 belonging to the Chahamanas records the genealogy of the Chahamanas upto the coronation of Somesvara and mentions names of several Brahmanical temples, then existing in Vindhyavali and neighbouring places. One of these temples was that of Mahakala
Wall Paintings of Hardoti School in the palace Bundi Explained in schools of paintings
Ghateshwar Temple Badoli Pratihara style of temples of the tenth century A.D. Of these temples, four are dedicated to Siva, two to Mahishamardini Durga and one each to Vishnu, Trimurti and Ganesa. Three temples, respectively dedicated to Siva as Ghatesvara, Mahishamardini and Trimurti have preserved their stately single spired nagara sikharas, two have partly preserved sikharas, clustered by anga-sikharas, another two have much damaged brick-built sikharas while two shrines have completely lost their superstructures
Mahanal Temple & Math Menal Mahanlal Temple and Math in Chittorgarh is dedicated to the Lord Shiva. Built around 11th century, this place became the centre of Shaivism during the reign of Chahamanas. Built in the Bhumija style of architecture with stellate  pancharatha ground plan and corresponding superstructure carrying strings of angasikharas, surmounted by a double amalaka, this temple speaks of utter magnificence and spirituality. A visit to this temple is a must while you are on your exploration tour of Chittorgarh.
Somnath Temple Deo Somnath Somnath Temple
Buddhist Caves and Pillars Binnayaga (Dag) Buddhist Caves and Pillars
Caves of Naranjani etc. Binnayaga (Dag) Caves of Naranjani etc.
Buddhist Caves Hathiagor Buddhist Caves
Buddhist Caves, Pillars, Idols Kolvi (Dag) Buddhist Caves, Pillars, Idols
Old Temples near the Chandrabhaga Jhalrapatan Old Temples near the Chandrabhaga
Ancient Mound Abaneri Ancient Mound
Baori Abaneri Baori
Harsat Mata ka Mandir Abaneri Harsat Mata ka Mandir
Banjaron ki Chhatri (containing two pillars similar to railing pillars of Bharhut Stupa) Lalsot Banjaron ki Chhatri (containing two pillars similar to railing pillars of Bharhut Stupa)
Sun Temple Amber Amber or Amer, anciently known as Ambavati, was the capital of the territory named Dhundara ruled by the Kachhawaha rulers before Jaipur was founded in 1727. Besides, a picturesque palace and fort, Amber is also known for its temples which are dedicated to both Jaina and Hindu pantheons. The famous Sun temple, situated to the west of Amber town on the slope of the hill faces  east-southeast. It consists of a square sanctum, a vestibule and pillared mandapa. The sanctum is pancharatha on plan with corbelled ceiling and open pradakshinapatha. The sikhara also follows the sanctum plan. The sukanasa is shown in the form of a hollow square passage. The bhadra niches are empty on all three sides. The mandapa rests on sixteen pillars with a vedi-kunda in the centre and has a flat ceiling. The temple is built of stone and brick and has been repaired in recent times. An inscription on one of the pillars in the front row of the mandapa is dated V.S. 1011 (A.D. 954).
Jama Masjid Amber This mosque is built on the usual plan has five arched screen and deep mihrab on the western wall.  In front of the mosque there is a courtyard entered through a small gateways from three directions. A Persian inscription to the left side of the central arch states that this mosque was built by the king of Amber, Bharmal by the order of emperor Akbar in A.D. 1569.
Laxmi Narain’s Temple Amber The temple consists of a sanctum, vestibule and an open assembly hall and rests on a high platform relieved with deep cells. It was built by Bala Bai, wife of Prithviraj of Kachhawaha dynasty in the first quarter of the sixteenth century A.D. Bala Bai, daughter of Rao Loon Karan of Bikaner, was a great devotee of lord Krishna.
Sri Jagat Siromani ji temple Amber The temple was built by Sringar Devi Kankawat, mother of Jagat Singh. The building includes an exquisitely carved marble torana, a Garuda chhatri and a high temple dedicated to Radha-Krishna.  Facing west, temple consists of sanctum, vestibule and mandapa, it stands on high orinate pitha followed by vedibandha and jangha.  The square sanctum is crowned by sikhara.  The pillared mandapa has lacteral trancepts with vaulted ceiling bear the paintings.  The construction was started in A.D. 1599 and completed in A.D. 1608.
Pundrik ji-ki-Haveli Paintings in a room Brahmpuri Ratnakar Pundrikji-ki-Haveli at Brahmpuri in Jaipur city, popularly known as Pundrikji-ki-Haveli, was built by Maharaja Sawai Jai Singh founder of Jaipur during the eighteenth century A.D. Ratnakar Pundrikji was royal purohit of Maharaja Sawai Jai Singh, he was also a great scholar of astrology and tantra. His original name was Ratnakar Bhatt. Originally belonging to Maharashtra, he  had come to Kashi (Varanasi) for advanced studies in astrology and tantra. At this place, Maharaja Sawai Jai Singh met him and was impressed by his expertise and astounding knowledge. Sawai Jai Singh then  brought him from Kashi to Jaipur and made him royal purohit, giving title of  ‘Pundrik’. Pundrikji-ki-Haveli is famous for having Jaipur school of mural paintings belonging to mid eighteenth century A.D. These paintings  depict scenes of royal court, celebration of Holi, Gangaur and other festivals,  royal processions and army movements from palaces.
Yupa Pillars Badwa The inscribed stone is a sacrificial pillar, commemorating revival of the rituals during third century A.D. by the Malava Republic. The inscription records the erection of the pillar by Ahisarman, son of Dharaka who was Agnihotri. Ahisarman seems to be a Malava chief.
Mand Kila Tal Inscription Nagar Mandkila Tal, locally known as Manikila Talav is situated near the ancient mound of Nagar, which was the capital site of the Malava Republic. The Mandkila Tal inscription dated V.S. 1043 (A.D. 987) reveals that prosperity of Nagar which was anciently known as Malava-nagara, continued up to the tenth century A.D. The first Vishnu temple, according to the inscription, was built by Nagahari, a rich merchant of the Dharkat caste, on the bank of a tank known as Vaidya-tadaga.  The inscription was issued by Nandana, fourth in descent from Nagahari, who either built a new temple or refurbished the old one and enshrined therein images of the gods Vishnu, Harihara and Surya, who are invoked in the initial verses.  The poet who composed this orinate inscription is high flown Sanskrit verses is stated to be a descendent of the famous author Bana, court poet of king Harshavardhana (early seventh Century A.D.). The existing temple is a modern structure enshrining old images.
Yupa Pillars in Bichpuria Temple Nagar The inscribed stone is a sacrificial pillar, commemorating revival of the rituals during third century A.D. by the Malava Republic. The inscription records the erection of the pillar by Ahisarman, son of Dharaka who was Agnihotri. Ahisarman seems to be a Malava chief.
Pipa ji’s Temple Todarai Singh Explained in Saints of Rajasthan
Akbar’s Chhatri Bayana It was built in honour of Akbar’s visit in A.D. 1601-2 after his conquest of Khandesh. Originally, this chhatri was square on plan with dome-shaped roof resting on four pillars which are now in ruins.

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